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Yellow-billed Kite in Africa



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The Yellow-billed Kite is the Afrotropic  counterpart of the Black Kite  of which it is most often considered a subspecies. However, recent DNA studies suggest that the Yellow-billed Kite differs si

Yellow-billed Kite in Africa Description

The Yellow-billed Kite is the Afrotropic  counterpart of the Black Kite  of which it is most often considered a subspecies. However, recent DNA studies suggest that the Yellow-billed Kite differs significantly from Black Kites in the Eurasian clade , and should be considered as a separate, allopatric  species.

 Behavior: This species is extremely opportunistic in its feeding habits, and the diet includes small vertebrates, insects (including winged termites), carrion, offal, and dead or dying fish. These kites may pirate prey from other bird species, feed on road kills and village dumps, and attend brushfires and grassland fires, sometimes in large congregations. They spend much of their time in low, searching flight, taking prey in flight, or from the ground.

Breeding: Nests are often in loose colonies and the small stick nest is lined with leaves, dung, rags, rope, plastic. bones, and other objects and placed in a tree (Bijlsma et al. 2005). In Mali, all nests were located near water. Clutch size is usually 2 eggs in southern Africa and 3 in West Africa. The eggs are white and marked with brown spots and splotches. All chicks usually survive. West African eggs averaged 50.9 x 39.9 mm (n= 15). The incubation period is about 30 days, and the nestling period is about 48 days (Tarboton 1990). The female handles most of the incubation duties and is fed by the male


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